Friday, August 28, 2015

Vines for Garden Bed Fencing


Its been a long time between blogs, but my gardening hands have not been resting. I single-handedly built a lasagna (no dig) garden bed a few months ago for our students to learn the importance of different types of gardening and the value of break-down of materials used to create a rich soil full of worms.

This month we finished off the garden by removing the bright orange plastic fencing in favour of a more natural earthly look to tie in with our Steiner Garden along the same side of the street.

The no-dig garden bed started off quite considerably higher. It has been left to sit for the last month or more now to break down naturally, so it has lost some height.

The challenge has been to keep the school children off of it so the bed stays in tact for its very first planting.


A small opening has been left to create a small gateway so that we can access irrigation
and the children can reach all sections.
So we recruited the Steiner people to collect grape vine cuttings from the vineyards around the McLaren Vale wine district, with July being the best month to score a trailer load.

Our garden volunteers joined me to transform our lovely new garden bed with bamboo stakes and a weaving of grape vines. I must say the finished product is just beautiful. Its organic and harmonious in the garden and seems to command respect for trespasses to leave it alone (which is the fear of any school gardener - so many things get stolen or misplaced).

I am very proud of our team effort to get the garden bed looking so natural that it has inspired the teachers to request that we look into further vine weaving projects for the school that the children could also enjoy in their active exploration play. Its all in the planning.



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